Yarrow Flowers (Achillea millefolium)

£8.25
By Napiers

Size
Description

A herbal food supplement

BOTANICAL NAME

Achillea millefolium

COMMON NAMES

Yarrow, Common Yarrow, Soldier's Woundwort, Staunchwort, Nosebleed Plant

FAMILY

Compositae (Asteraceae)

Native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Asia and Europe and North America.

DESCRIPTION

A flowering plant that multiples easily and could therefore become a stubborn weed.  

PART SUPPLIED

The loose dried flowers.

AVAILABLE AS

100g / 500g Pouch. Not currently available to customers in the EU.

SUITABLE FOR

Vegetarians and vegans.

DIRECTIONS

Use 1 teaspoon of dried herb to one cup of boiling water to make a tasty tea. Infuse for 5-10 minutes. Sweeten with honey or lemon to taste.

Alternatively add half a teaspoon (2.5 ml) of tincture to a cup of warm water for a quick alternative to tea.

The herb can be added as a flavouring to gin, vodka and other infusions.

CAUTIONS

This herb is considered safe in food amounts. Do not take if you are allergic to this plant or other members of this plant's family (Compositae/Asteraceae). Contact reactions are fairly common. Not all herbs are suitable in pregnancy, breastfeeding or for young children, or if you are unwell, have health concerns or an ongoing illness. If in doubt, please ask us, your medical herbalist or healthcare practitioner. If you are taking any medication, please speak to your healthcare practitioner before using this product. Discontinue use and consult a doctor if adverse reactions occur. This product should not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet or lifestyle. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 

FOOD USE

Yarrow tastes a little like rosemary and can be used as its alternative to flavour meat dishes. Particularly suitable finely chopped with pheasant, hare, rabbit, squirrel or seafood as it can be a bit overpowering with milder game.

In Scandinavia, yarrow is called 'Field Hops' and used instead of hops to flavour beer or 'gruit ale'. The flowers and young leaves are used to make herbal teas where its antispasmodic properties help relaxation and improve wellbeing (and even, it is reputed, libido).  In Orkney 'Milfoil Tea' as it is known is taken to dispel melancholy.

MEDICINAL USE

In herbal medicine it is often used in teas to head off colds and boost immunity, as well as to treat internal injury or bleeding. There are many common names for Yarrow but of note are those hinting at its healing properties: Woundwort, Nosebleed, Staunchwort, Bloodwort. In fact the botanical name Achillea was earned as yarrow was reportedly used to heal Achilles heel. 

In the Scottish Highlands fresh yarrow leaves were used as a pain-killing, styptic ointment for wounds and bleeding piles. This could be recreated by steeping yarrow leaves in gently heated oil, then strained and mixed with beeswax before cooling. 

In the Outer Hebrides, a leaf would be chewed to freshen the breath or to relieve a heavy period. It also contains alkamides which are pain-killing, anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant, with digestive and immune boosting properties. 

Remedy for a fever, stimulates digestion, antiseptic for the urinary tract, tones blood vessels. 

Key actions: Choleretic (increases bile), diaphoretic (induces perspiration), antibacterial, astringent, antispasmodic.

In clinic: Herbalists use this herb to treat common colds, fevers, diarrhoea, excessive bleeding and menstrual issues.    

If you are interested in the medicinal use of this herb please consult a herbalist. Herbs are generally used at medicinal strength, in blends, prescribed for each unique patient's condition.

COSMETIC USE

Cosmetically, yarrow tea can also be used as an astringent cleanser for oily skin, as a rinse for oily or greying hair or as a facial steam.

It is fantastic used after shaving to help heal nicks and cuts in record time! To make your aftershave astringent: cover yarrow leaves with neat vodka and leave in a sunny place for 3 weeks to produce a yarrow tincture. Combine with witch hazel, and if desired scent with a little bay and lemon oil.

OTHER USES

Yarrow got its botanical name from Achilles who was reputed to have used the herb to staunch his wounds. Traditionally, Scottish children would use yarrow leaves to staunch a nose bleed!

In the Scottish Highlands fresh yarrow leaves were used as a pain-killing, styptic ointment for wounds and bleeding piles. This could be recreated by steeping yarrow leaves in gently heated oil, then strained and mixed with beeswax before cooling. 

In the Outer Hebrides, a leaf would be chewed to freshen the breath or to relieve a heavy period.  

A few leaves added to your compost pile will help to accelerate decomposition. 

STORAGE

Keep in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight. Keep out of reach of children.

PACKAGING
Pouches: Packaged in a biodegradable stand-up resealable pouch. Made with 45% - 60% renewable wood pulp starch. When placed into a composting environment the pouches will biodegrade to compost within 3 months.

A trust kept since 1860

Napiers the Herbalists was founded by Duncan Napier, a Victorian botanist and the most famous herbalist in Scotland.